End-up? Or end up? There IS a difference.

When to hyphenate and when not to.  This is a common issue.  Here is a sentence from an article about an art show:

Artists that make their living this way generally end-up with pieces that have been nicked or otherwise damaged in the constant load and unloading that they do.

In this example, END is a verb, and UP is an adverb.  They should not be connected by a hyphen.  END UP should be treated the same as TWO YEAR OLD.  The hyphen would only be used if you were creating an adjective to go in front of a noun, as in A TWO-YEAR-OLD CONTRACT or AN END-UP something or other (I cannot think of a good example for this usage!).

 

BONUS COMMENT #1: I would suggest changing THAT to WHO when referring to the ARTISTS. (Use WHO for people and THAT for "non-people" things.)

 

BONUS COMMENT #2: Because UNLOADING ends in ING, I would use parallel structure and use LOADING as well.

 

Here is my edit for this sentence:

Artists who make their living this way generally end up with pieces that have been nicked or otherwise damaged in the constant loading and unloading that they do.

 

If you would like additional information about correct hyphen usage, run a Search (lower right corner) for "Hyphen," and see all the posts that come up.  Among them should be my posts for November 23, 2010 and March 5, 2009 and October 30, 2008.  This is definitely at least an annual issue.


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One Response to “End-up? Or end up? There IS a difference.”

  1. You most likely hear this often but your writing is just so fun. Thank you for adding delight in my life with the work you do. Please don’t stop with all your ideas.

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