Another reminder about “earring” commas

I have written before about the need to use commas in a pair (like most earrings) when setting off a phrase or clause within another clause.  Here is a good example of this from the article, "Stretching Your Potential," in this month's 280 Living.

This knowledge, along with his superior skills in physical and athletic assessment makes him an invaluable asset to any training, correction or treatment program.

Whoops! The phrase highlighted in red above should be set off within the basic sentence.  The writer remembered the first comma (between KNOWLEDGE and ALONG) but forgot to add another comma between ASSESSMENT and MAKES.  I call these pairs of commas "earring commas" because both are needed for a well accessorized sentence.   

This sentence should be punctuated this way:

This knowledge, along with his superior skills in physical and athletic assessment, makes him an invaluable asset to any training, correction or treatment program.


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