Inserted phrase should not affect subject/verb relationship.

It is good news that Honda has just announced an expansion of capacity at its Alabama auto plant.  The plant, located in Lincoln (near the Talladega Superspeedway), is set to become the highest-volume automaker in the state, building more than 300,000 cars a year.

One sentence in the article about this (front page of the Business section in The Birmingham News on Sunday, November 13) has a subject/verb agreement problem:

Gov. Robert Bentley, along with other state and local leaders, are expected to attend a special ceremony Monday at the $1.5 billion, 4,000-worker Lincoln plant.

Whoops! The subject of this sentence is GOV. ROBERT BENTLEY, so the verb should be IS (singular).  Reporter Dawn Kent inserted the phrase ALONG WITH OTHER STATE AND LOCAL LEADERS between BENTLEY and the verb, which is fine.  However, that inserted phrase is not part of the subject and does not affect the relationship between BENTLEY and IS. It does not create a compound subject.  The sentence should read as follows:

Gov. Robert Bentley, along with other state and local leaders, is expected to attend a special ceremony Monday at the $1.5 billion, 4,000-worker Lincoln plant.

 

 


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3 Responses to “Inserted phrase should not affect subject/verb relationship.”

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