Poor usage reflects poorly on the writer.

 Are those who write for digital media more careless with usage than those who write for print? I do not know the answer to that, but I have come across a wave of incorrect usage on AL.com since I have had to migrate there four out of seven days a week. The reporters who make these mistakes come across as ESL students who are still learning a new language!

Here is one example:

In more cases than not, when I take guests on cruises, they will go off shore wearing two, three, or for layers of clothing.

 This is pretty basic: FOR is a preposition. The numeral that comes after THREE should be FOUR. Note that spell checker would not catch this error because both FOR and FOUR are words. The sentence should read this way:

In more cases than not, when I take guests on cruises, they will go off shore wearing two, three, or four layers of clothing.

Here is a second example:

W's father and his stepmother said even though they had visited their son in Walter Reed, the site of him arriving at the airport was 'overwhelming.'

The SITE (location) of the reunion with their son was the airport, but when they actually SAW him (with their eyes), that was a SIGHT (with their eyes) that was overwhelming. This sentence should read as follows:

W's father and his stepmother said even though they had visited their son in Walter Reed, the sight of him arriving at the airport was 'overwhelming.'

 

And finally, last week after the election, there was this:

This local candidate apparently road the coattails of statewide candidates.

The past tense of RIDE, which is what is needed here, is RODE. If you have a paved surface on which to do your RIDING, that would be a ROAD. Here is the corrected version of this sentence:

This local candidate apparently rode the coattails of statewide candidates.


Tags: ,

Leave a Reply